Lora is a group of locally owned restaurants in wicomico county and delmar that have banded together to address common issues and marketing goals in its local community.

Lora (Local Owner Restaurant Association) is a group of locally owned foodservice properties that support the local economy by giving back to their communities in the form of donations to local charities, schools, community organizations and other fund raising endeavors to enhance the lives of its local friends, neighbors and customers. The individual restaurants allow customers to sample local favorites and regional cuisine at modest prices while helping the local economy at the same time by keeping more money in the area.  The owners live, work and raise their children in the same community that they operate their businesses in and care about the economy and the quality of life in those communities.

“EATING AT A LOCAL RESTAURANT ENSURES A MORE PROPEROUS COMMUNITY TO LIVE AND RAISE YOUR CHILDREN IN”

National studies have shown that when customers spent money at a local restaurant and business that almost 2 times as much money stays in the community and local economy versus spending at a national franchised restaurant or business.

KeepItLocal_DiningCardFront

Pick up your own lora Frequent diner club card at decorating delmarva or any of the other lora community events.

HOW DOES THE EXTRA MONEY THAT STAYS IN THE COMMUNITY HELP LOCAL FAMILIES?

Money that stays in the community will allow other local businesses to spend more money in the community.  That money will be used to buy from other service companies and stores which in turn employ more people to support those suppliers.  The money allows parents of local children to participate in more extracurricular activities which help to enrichen the lives of their children. The locally owned business is also more financially invested in the prosperity and growth of their community.

Obviously, the more profit that a business owner receives, the more they will spent in the community.  It is simple economics that enriches all employees that are employed at all businesses in the area

How does the math work?

When comparing a national or franchised restaurant to a locally owned restaurant, the breakdown between dollars that stay in the local community versus the dollars that leave can be detailed and complicated, but the following is a generally accepted guideline of the differences.  The below analysis shows the dollars that stay in the community as being black and the dollars that go away as being red. The percentages can be related to dollars per $100 dollars spent.

National               Local

Food Cost                   33%                    30%     5%
Labor Cost                 30%                    32%
Other Operating         5%                      4%      1%
Other Expenses          5%                      5%
Advertising                  4%   1%              5%
Maintenance               3%                      3%
Royalties                      4%                      –
Acct/Legal                   1%                       1%
Utilities                         3%                      3%
Local Taxes/Fees       1%                       1%
Profits                         10%                     10%
—————————————————–
National  Local $        32%
Locally owned  $                                    63%

                                 $32                     $63

 

National/Franchised

In a national or franchised corporate owned restaurant, the only dollars that stay in the community are the labor dollars spent for the staff and store level management along with the required local advertising by their franchise agreement and the local taxes paid.  The majority of all other monies leave the community.  Some franchises do use some local service companies for minor maintenance issues.

Locally Owned

In a locally owned restaurant, the only dollars that leave the community are the food cost dollars that are spent from a large national food supplier along with paper, chemical, serving ware, linen and cleaning supplies. Utility monies also leave the community.  The majority of their dollars stay in their communities. Local restaurants try to buy local produce and any other supplies from local businesses when possible and are not mandated to purchase from their commissaries.